Relationships

When is the right time to announce a pregnancy?

30th Mar, 05:54


One of the best things about receiving any kind of exciting news is getting to share it with your mates.

You pop bubbles shortly after popping the question, post selfies with celebrities on Insta within minutes of them being snapped, and we’re willing to bet there’s not a single job promotion that hasn’t been followed with a few well-earned frothies with the lads down at the local.

So why is there a general consensus to wait a while before you tell the world that you and your partner are expecting a little bundle of joy?

The reasons for this are easily explained.

The risk of miscarriage

Anybody who has experienced miscarriage knows how crushing its effects are for both themselves and their partner.

The most exciting and hopeful news you’re likely to celebrate in your lives is ripped from your hands and there’s nothing either of you can do other than support each other and let time do most of the healing.

Unfortunately miscarriage is not uncommon and remains a tangible risk for those who go through the process of starting (or expanding) a family.

One thing to note, however, is how much the risk of miscarriage is diminished once the first trimester of pregnancy is complete.

In numbers

While there are many factors that can contribute to miscarriage, the likelihood of a foetus surviving to term vastly increases after the 12-week mark, which is why it is generally advised to hold off until then before announcing your exciting news.

Though everybody is different, and you’ll likely want to tell your inner circle (trust us, hiding this much excitement from everybody is damn-near impossible), it can be pretty devastating to have to announce to extended friends and family that you lost the baby just a few short weeks after announcing a pregnancy.

Waiting until the tests are back

After your partner has missed a period, started to feel gross in the AM, and done the obligatory pee-on-a-stick test, you’ll both want to go to the doctor and have a few “proper” tests done. The first visit should be at around the eight week mark, and you’ll find out a whole bunch of super important information about what to expect next.

You’ll also get referred for an ultrasound. This is one of the most (for lack of a better word) awesome parts of finding out about a new member of the family, as you and your partner will be able to see your baby’s heartbeat for the first time.

Between this and a couple of other important tests, an obstetrician will be able to determine any early warning signs that things might not be 100 per cent, so it’s a good idea to wait at least until these have been completed.

Announcing at other milestones

While that little blue line on the pee-soaked-stick is all you’ll need in terms of motivation to go and sing from the nearest rooftop, there are plenty of other milestones along the way that might be better suited to make an announcement. Some of these are:

  • Baby’s first ultrasound
  • When mum starts to show a baby bump
  • Finding out the sex of the baby (but seriously, avoid the daggy gender reveal stunt).

Talking to your obstetrician

Ultimately, while we think we’re pretty bloody good at dishing out some sound snippets of wisdom, the best advice when it comes to anything baby-related will always come from your obstetrician.

At the end of the day, exactly when you decide to tell your friends and family that you and your partner are expecting is entirely your own business, and there’s no right or wrong.

Like most things, however, it just helps to be armed with some facts and statistics to ensure that when you do tell the world your happy news you can do it with a certain degree of confidence.